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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 07/21/17

Friday, July 21, 2017

FIESTA DE LA TIRANA FROM CHILE!







   Celebration of the Tirana is a celebration of religious character realised annually in the town of the Tirana, commune Almonte Well, in the Region of Tarapacá, Chile. The celebration is realised each 16th of July, in honor to the Virgin of the Carmen. This is the greater religious celebration of the Great North of Chile and the second most popular one of Chile after the Celebration of the Rosary of Andacollo, meeting in this town of no more than 560 inhabitants between 200,000 and 250,000 visitors during the week of celebrations.

Origin

   According to the legend, Diego de Almagro in his route towards the discovery of Chile from Cuzco took in his retinue to a incaico prince captive call Huillac Huma and that was the last priest of the cult to Inti. Next to him, her beautiful called daughter Ñusta went.
   When the army was near the present town of Goad, many of the prisoners Incas fled towards Pampas of the Tamarugal, among them, Ñusta Huillac and its father. Refugees in the forests of tamarugos, Ñusta Huillac organized a rebellion to restore the power of its nation, being arrived to be feared so much for its enemies named who it like the “Tirana of the Tamarugal”.










   A day Portuguese Basque call arrived an expeditionary young person from Almeida that was lost its route towards the mythical “Mine of the Sun”. The sling between the beautiful queen and the Portuguese was immediate. When its relation was open pie, both were condemned until death. Almeida, as a form of which their love is eternal, convinces to Ñusta Huillac so that it is baptized thus and after the death, would appear again in further on and would live united for always. Both are shortages in the ceremony and are assassinated by the native ones.
   In 1540, it passed through the town of “the Tirana” the friar Antonio Rendón, finding a cross, and as it forms of homenajear to these young people, a chapel under the name of “Our Lady of the Carmen of the Tirana” is constructed in the place.











Celebration of the Tirana
   The Celebration of the girl is an Andean festival related to the tie Pachamama the Virgin of Copacabana, since the works farmers. His origin like celebration is miner created by the workers aymarás, Peruvian Bolivians and who worked in the mines of copper and silver in Huantajaya, Santa Rosa and Collahuasi and arrived at San Lorenzo de Tarapacá like workers of the saltpeter. In century XIX the celebration was redefined with the salitrero height and it was celebrated the 16th of July in Pampas and the 28th of July in Iquique. By the end of century XIX, after the War of the Pacific, the celebration was celebrated in diverse dates: 6th of August for the Bolivians, 28th of July for Peruvian and the 16th  of July for the Chileans.








The diverse groups of dancers who went to solemnize the celebrations of the Carmen of the Tirana, returned the day before yesterday of Almonte Well, in a convoy of 19 cars. Just arrived they say that the concurrence that attended the celebration passed it pleasantly, then, aside from the religious ceremonies that ilustrísimo celebrated Mr. Obispo, the devotee ones and the profane ones are past true days of wide field enjoying to their [...] the preparations for the next festivals of the 28 July, follow Pampas in his point. In the office Rosary of Huara a great dance is prepared for which already they have been distributed more than 100 invitations. Equal manifestations are also prepared in other offices of the environs of Huara. It seems, then, that next the 28 of July will be celebrated noisily by Peruvian and Chilean, in amiable partnership, that doubtlessly will contribute to erase the harshness of the past, honoring this common date to all Latin America.
Pepe Hillo. Newspaper the National, Friday 24th of July of 1903


Towards 1910, like part of the chilenización of Tarapacá, a unique day the 16 of July is included this new festival in the Chilean calendar evoking to the Virgin of the Carmen employer of the Army of Chile.  Peruvian and Bolivian brotherhoods was moved of the celebration as of 1911, granting to the "Chinese dance", the oldest one of the Chilean dances of the Tirana (founded on 1908), the right to remove to the Virgin during the procession. As a celebration,  until 1917,   were separated of the authorities of the church. He was the then bishop Expensive Jose Maria who approached the dances the catholic rite.










   The construction of the church of the Virgin of the Carmen in the place Arica de Iquique in 1933, initiative of the Clarisa brothers, Alexander and Luis Gamboni, transferred the celebrations of the desert to the coast giving origin to the Celebration of “the Small Tirana”, which is realised immediately after the Celebration of the Tirana (called “the small Tirana").



Dances

Some of most important are:


  • Antawaras: Are dances realised in end and with arms standing up raised, originated in the incaicas ceremonies of cult to the Sun, which explains the invocativo character of the arms towards the sky. The man dances with clothes uniforms decorated, a hat of color felt generally cream and poncho thin scenery with spangles and wool of colors. The women use chicken farmers, decorated blouse, low hat of felt and shoes.






  • Chinese: Brought from the sanctuary of Andacollo, they are of Hispanic origin. It owns a dance of expansion, characterized by its brincos and their exercises of balance. The Chinese dress suits color coffee to car me especially embroidered it, next to moored pieces of leather to the waist. Music is based on instruments aerophones monocorde and a tamboril. Although traidicionalmente it is a masculine dance, at present exist some incorporated women, nowadays the society religios “Chinese Dance” is oldest in the festival.

  • Chunchos: Mixed dance of Bolivian origin, the dancers describe circles, with long steps and jumps. These take to a wood lance in the denominated hand “chonta” connected to a tense cable that allows to percutir with the wood being generated characteristic a smooth sound. It is accompanied with whistles, drums (big drums) and box and in the last years have been aggregates percussion instruments and bronzes. The dresses, although are of uniform colors, are ornamented with colorful pens and in some cases a plume in the head behaves.









  • Gypsys: As it says his name to it, the dance evokes the traditions of the gypsy groups, with colorful clothes and where they emphasize the use of handkerchiefs (in the case of the men, it is used extended behind shoulders). The women accompany music with the use by panderetas. For being of nonChristian origin, they do not dance in the place in front of the church but to a flank of her.

  • Indians: Dances originated under influence of the American cinema. The dances imitate the representations of North American natives (like apaches, and sioux). The clothes is sent to touched lengths of pens and cintillos and the use of lances to mark the compass of music. At night great bonfires around which are realised dance.









  • Kayahuallas: Also of Andean pre-Hispanic origin, one resembles to trote. The dancers standing up realise passages with raised knee and end in mimetic and choral dances. The man uses trousers of a single color adorned with brightness and a pechera with an X decorated in this one. In addition, they carry a decorated umbrella. The women, in as much, use apron and decorated chicken farmers plus a felt hat and shirts. The dance is original of Bolivia, was the first brotherhood that insipiro its rite in one dances folk Bolivian around 1973, being the first proviniente brotherhood you take care of of it of Arica.

  • Kullacas: In quechua, “older sister”. Inca goes back to the ceremonial dances of the Virgins of the Sun of the Empire. This feminine dance consists of diverse women who turn around a great twig. Each dancing takes to a tape of color together with the least upper bound of the twig, reason why throughout the dance, the different tapes are braided in the post.








  • Colored people: This dance very characteristic of the religious celebrations of the North of Chile represents the slaves of the original towns of the North of Chile (propiamnte miners) which were forced to work for the colonists. In both dances a matraca is used simulating the sonar of the chains of these or after celebration or withdrawal. As two are come off correintes:

Of step or pitucos: This is a solemn, slow dance and a little funeral, in which dance to the rate of a march with the straight chest and the head in stop, the dancers realise crossings from a row to another one to the rate of the big drums or drums and boxes, these dances can be mixed or of a single sort, the typical suits of this dance is a straight suit of two or three bellboys in case of the men, who can be of any color (preferably dark) and in the case of the women is a suit of two pieces made up of a skirt until the knees and a jacket similar to the one of the man but with another cut, both use a tape crossed to the chest and a rose in the arm.








Of Jump: It shows this us the slaves jumping and celebrating its liberation, the rate that is used in this dance is denominated like two by three (2x3) in which is in one fourth two times and in the other half of fourth three more expresses are included, the suits of this brotherhood are of strong colors (generally white or tonalities of this) having patalón, blouse or shirt, wraps or belt and in some cases jackets or small layers that arrive until the waist.

 the Celebration

   The celebration they attend originating faithfuls of diverse parts of Chile, Peru and Bolivia.   When arriving at the town, the pilgrims sings with joy, diverse songs, like the following one intoned by faithfuls of the north of Chile:


Natural, déjenos fields to happen,
because your nortinos come to dance.
Abránse the streets, dénnos the way,
because we already arrived at our destiny









   When arriving at the town, the dancing religious brotherhoods initiate their tributes, of a one through a greeting in the same place known like “the Calvary”. Thus, the religious protocol of the celebration continues in the temple, with the traditional songs and dances, greetings and processions. In the temple first it is the greeting to the Greater Altar of the virgin. In individual form or small groups, the pilgrims realise diverse sacrifices to fulfill their offers or requests, being the most popular the one to arrive at the sanctuary crawling or made kneel.
   When the clock marks the 00:00 of day 16th of July, fireworks explode and the celebration reaches its maximum point in music, dance and songs to celebrate the birthday of the Virgin. Gallery of Photos is what is called “the Eve”. In the place, a misa with all the population of the place is celebrated singing the dawn.










   After to finish to the misa of Eve the dancers you begin its goodbyes, in which it is sung and it danced to the Virgin for the last time until the other year, after to take leave of the image of the Virgin the dancers they leave from return made the cross of the Calvary take leave of the image of Jesus and give the last gratefulness to the brotherhood, after this part became soothes of the brotherhood dancing and singing “trote”.


Lack little to go to me,
of this town so loved.
I am going away to go!
Leaving sad hearts.

ESTONIA SONG AND DANCE FESTIVAL!

Image result for estonian song festival 2017






   Have you ever heard 18,000 voices singing at once? This emotional experience can be felt during Estonia's Song Festival, which occurs once every five years in Tallinn. Once in five years, tens of thousands of Estonians gather in Tallinn in the summertime to take part in the Song and Dance Festival.
   The Song Festival is an enormous open-air choir concert held at the Tallinn Song Festival Grounds with the participation of hundreds of choirs and thousands of singers. The number of participants in the Song Festival can reach up to 25 or 30 thousand, but the greatest number of people is on stage during the performance of the joined choirs—there are usually 18 000 singers on stage at that moment, and their powerful song touches even the most frigid Nordic disposition.  This years celebration was held from June 30th to July 2nd 2017.










    Not every choir in Estonia is able to perform at the Song Festival. Due to the popularity of the festival, there is stiff competition among the choirs, and the repertoire is rehearsed for years in advance. Only the best choirs make it to the festival.

History of the Song Festivals

   In the 19th century, Estonia was a province of a Russian Empire where German upper class landlords ruled the Estonian lower class - the peasants. The 1860s marked the beginning of a period of National Awakening. The Song Festival tradition began with the first Song Festival organised by Johann Voldemar Jannsen and the "Vanemuise" society in Tartu in June 1869. 51 male choirs and 5 brass bands encompassing 845 singers and musicians gathered in Tartu.










   The first Song Festival was a high point for the Estonian national movement. The Song Festival was also a great musical event, which created the Song Festival tradition. Six Song Festivals were held from 1879-1910, which played an important role in the nation's cultural and economic awakening and growth. The tradition of holding Song Festivals every five years began during the first Estonian independence. During World War II the tradition of Song Festivals was interrupted, but it began again in 1947. Since 1950, the Song Festivals have been held every five years. 1969 was an exception because the 100th anniversary of the Song Festival was celebrated.





I little of the night festivities




   The Song Festivals have taken place regardless of the political situation. The foreign authorities have tried to use the Song Festivals in their own interests. The Soviet regime always tied the Song Festivals to the "red holidays". Foreign and propagandist songs had to be sung in order to preserve the chance to sing Estonian songs. A good example of an Estonian song was "Mu isamaa on minu arm", which during the occupation years became an unofficial anthem for the Estonians, and which, performed by the joined choirs to the standing audience, ended every Song Festival.

The Song Festival becomes a role model

   The term "the singing nation" expresses well the Estonian identity that has united the nation in its struggle for national independence before 1918 and during the period of the Soviet Occupation (1941-1991). In 1988 began the so-called "Singing Revolution", based on the Song Festival tradition, when hundreds of thousands of people gathered in the Song Festival Grounds to make political demands and sing patriotic songs. There is a belief that Estonians sang themselves free from the Russian occupation. More than 300 000 people participated in a huge event entitled "The Song of Estonia" in       September 1988, and for the first time the re-establishment of Estonia's independence was openly demanded.









Song Festival Grounds

   The I, II, IV and V Song Festivals took place in Tartu, the rest in Tallinn. The present Song Festival Grounds beheld the first festival in 1928, on a specially erected stage. The present stage was built in 1960, when the XV Song Festival took place. The biggest joined choir that has ever sung on that stage was 24 500 people (during the 100th anniversary in 1969). The joined choir usually comprises of 18 000 people, the whole Song Festival team 25-30 000 people.
   On the Song Festival Grounds there is space for more than 100 000 spectators.

Dance Festival

   The first Estonian Games, Dance and Gymnastics festival, held in 1934, was the precursor of the present Dance Festival. 1,500 folk dancers performed there.
The Dance Festival is a complete performance with a certain theme. The dancers in their bright national costumes form several colourful patterns on the dance field. The Dance Festival is usually held on the same weekend as the Song Festival. These two festivals commence with a united festive parade through the city from the centre of Tallinn to the Song Festival Grounds.





The Celebration Flame making its journey to the Festival




   The greatest Dance Festival of all times (the 9th) took place in 1970 with over 10 000 performers. By then a structure based on age groups had developed with performers including toddlers and seniors, the dancing veterans. The youngest dancer at this festival was 4 years old and the oldest 76! All the following festivals have had the optimal 8 000 performers.
   In November 2003, UNESCO declared Estonia’s Song and Dance Festival tradition a masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity.





The annual parade




Recent and upcoming Song and Dance Festivals

   The 25th Song and Dance Festival took place from 2 - 5 July 2009 in Tallinn. The Song Festival celebrated its 140th anniversary, the Dance Festival its 75th. The total number of performers was 34 000 and they performed before an audience of 200 000!
  

The story of the 11th Youth Song and Dance Celebration

The wide world begins in a small land

We all experience the world through our own eyes. The big becomes big only when seen side by side with the small.
A small child’s perception of the world may be much wider than that of a grown-up. And a small nation can be big in the eyes of the world if it is great in spirit and mind.
The desire to see the big world takes us away from home until we understand that home is where the world begins. And when we realise that, we will return.
We will return because it is only here where the stories about our land and our people are born. The stories that will always be remembered, treasured and continued.









 

   The traditional components of the song and dance celebration – the opening and final ceremony, dance performances and the song celebration – take place in open air, in the territory of Tallinn Song Festival Grounds. As the number of seats is limited, we recommend you to purchase tickets beforehand.
   The public can follow the parade of the song and dance celebration from the beginning to the end (no ticket required). All song and dance celebration participants will walk from the centre of Tallinn to the Song Festival Grounds together in a joint parade. The parade is as important a tradition as the fire of the song and dance celebration which is lit in the lighthouse of the song festival grounds in the beginning of the celebration.





A picture from years gone by



   XI Youth Song Celebration is almost a 6-hour long concert with different choirs and orchestras performing. The songs and music take the most powerful form when joint choirs start performing.
   XI Youth Dance Celebration  is almost a 2-hour dance performance with thousands of dancers’ and gymnasts’ groups on the dance ground. Together they form beautiful dance patterns and all in all perform more than 20 different dances and gymnastics’ programs.
The first dance performance starts with the joint opening ceremony of the XI Youth Song and Dance Festival. The joint choirs will stand on the song stage and the dancers will perform on the area in front of the stage. The lighting of the song and dance celebration fire forms an important part of the opening ceremony.












   It is best to follow the dance performance from above as then the beautiful dance patterns will be better to follow. At the same time – sitting close to the performance, the viewers can see the beautiful national costumes that the dancers are wearing, and also the details of the dances.

About the tradition of Song and Dance Celebration in Estonia

   The tradition of Estonian song and dance celebrations dates back to the year 1869.
   By now there have been 25 song celebrations, 18 dance celebrations and 10 youth song and dance celebrations.  The last song and dance celebration took place in 2009 and the next one will take place in 2014.
The last youth song and dance celebration was held in 2007. After the celebration in 2011 the next youth song and dance celebration will be held in 2017.

 

TUB RACING FROM ITO CITY, JAPAN!!

Row, Row, Row Your Tub


   Most people associate ‘tubs’ with showering, bathing, and even having hot sex. For the folks in Ito City, Japan, tubs are instead used to race down the banks of the Matsukawa River.




JapaneseTubRacing Row, Row, Row Your Tub picture



   Back during the early part of the 20th century, the residents of Ito City would line up alongside the Matukawa River and wash their clothes using small wooden tubs.
Sometime around the 1950s, they started using the tubs as boats, and then they eventually began racing down the river with them. The event was soon after, in 1955, officially designated as an annual race in the hopes that it would attract tourists.
54 years have passed and yet people continue to race annually, with over 200 participants — including men, women, children, and even ducks — having shown up in July for this year’s festivities.








   And you can’t just be some geek off the street to make it big at the Ito City race, which is divided into categories based on age, gender, and country. It takes some real skill to succeed at this daring venture, including the ability to keep your tub afloat, the strength to not topple off, and the endurance to out-paddle your competitors to the 400 meter finish line.
   It helps too if you have as much team spirit as Hidekyuki Okamoto, who praised the experience as his teammates hollered, “PARTY!”





 

ST. ANTHONY'S FEAST DAY!!






  Catholic Feast days are days set aside to remember important people who lived extraordinary lives. Feast days were celebrated through the course of Our faith from the time of Mary's birth all the way through today honoring the saints. Most saints and holy people have specially designated feast days. On those days we remember these holy men and women in a special way. Saint Anthony of Padua died on June 13th, 1231, which is his feast day.










Customs of St. Anthony's Festival

   On the Feast of this most wonderful of Saints, your priest might bless lilies for you to keep (this isn't a universal practice). The blessing of lilies, which remind us of St. Anthony's purity and have always been a symbol for him, stems from a miracle which took place in Revolutionary France: many priests and religious were murdered, so many churches and convents destroyed, but the faithful still showed up at a surviving church on the Feast of St. Anthony. Months later, it was discovered that lilies that had adorned the church at that feast were still fresh. Let the lilies beautify your house, or carry them with you, or press them in a book, etc. If your priest doesn't bless lilies, you can still use them non-sacramentally to remind you of one of the greatest Saints ever. The English of the Blessing of the Lilies is as follows:










The Blessing of Lilies on the Feast of St. Anthony
The priest vests in surplice and white stole, and says:

P: Our help is in the name of the Lord.
All: Who made heaven and earth.
P: The Lord be with you.
All: And with thy spirit.
P: Let us pray. God, the Creator and Preserver of the human race, the Lover of holy purity, the Giver of supernatural grace, and the Dispenser of everlasting salvation; bless + these lilies which we, Thy humble servants, present to Thee today as an act of thanksgiving and in honor of St. Anthony, Thy confessor, and with a request for Thy blessing. Pour out on them, by the saving sign + of the holy cross, Thy dew from on high. Thou in Thy great kindness hast given them to man, and endowed them with a sweet fragrance to lighten the burden of the sick. Therefore, let them be filled with such power that, whether they are used by the sick, or kept in homes or other places, or devoutly carried on one's person, they may serve to drive out evil spirits, safeguard holy chastity, and turn away illness--all this through the prayers of St. Anthony--and finally impart to Thy servants grace and peace; through Christ our Lord.
All: Amen.









                      Then he sprinkles the lilies with holy water, saying:

P: Sprinkle me with hyssop, Lord, and I shall be clean of sin. Wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow. Pray for us, St. Anthony.
All: That we may be worthy of Christ's promise.
P: Let us pray. We beg Thee, O Lord, that Thy people may be helped by the constant and devout intercession of Blessed Anthony, Thy illustrious confessor. May he assist us to be worthy of Thy grace in this life, and to attain everlasting joys in the life to come; through Christ our Lord.
All: Amen.

                      After this the lilies are distributed to the people.










   Another custom on this day is known as "St. Anthony's Bread" and goes back to A.D. 1263 when a child drowned near the Basilica of St. Anthony in Padua as it was still being built. The mother besought St. Anthony and promised that if her child were restored to life, she would give to the poor an amount of wheat equal to the weight of her child. Of course her son was saved, and her promise was kept. "St. Anthony's Bread," then, is the promise of giving alms in return for a favor asked of God through St. Anthony's intercession (the custom also takes place throughout the year when parents give alms after placing their baby under the patronage of St. Anthony). In some places, the custom has a literal parallel in that loaves of bread might be blessed and given away at church or, generally, to the poor.
   Because of St. Anthony's history of being invoked by single women in search of a husband, today is a good day for single people who have a vocation to marriage to make a visit to a church or shrine dedicated to St. Anthony!










   In Lisbon, his birthplace, it is a traditional day for getting married (women who get married on this day are called "brides of St. Anthony"). So popular are weddings on this day in Lisbon, that the city hall hosts them for free if the couple are poor. St. Anthony altars are built and decorated, parades are held, bonfires lit, grilled sardines and sangria are enjoyed.









Sangria

1 (750-ml) bottle red wine (Rioja, if possible)
1/4 cup brandy
1/4 cup orange flavored liqueur (triple sec or Grand Marnier)
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 tablespoons fresh orange juice
1/4 cup sugar
1/2 orange, thinly sliced
1/2 lemon, thinly sliced
1 apple, cored, and cut into thin wedges
1 (750-ml) bottle sparkling water, chilled
   Combine everything but the sparkling water in a large plastic container or glass pitchers. Cover and chill completely, 1 to 2 hours. When ready to serve, add the sparkling water, pour over ice cubes, and enjoy.
   It is also customary to decorate with pots of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum) and to give some away to friends with prayers invoking our Saint (tea made from basil is good for headaches, fevers, stomach aches, and indigestion -- but it should not be drunk by pregnant women).










   Finally, because he is also especially cherished by the Italian people, parishes with large Italian populations might host great festivals on this day, rather like the Italian festivals held in honor of St. Joseph on 19 March, so keep an eye out for one in your area.
Note: Because St. Anthony was buried on a Tuesday and many miracles accompanied his funeral, Tuesdays are special days of honoring him throughout the year. It is customary to pray a Novena to him on thirteen consecutive Tuesdays.









A Multitude of Fish
                    
    No sooner had he spoken a few words when suddenly so great a multitude of fish, both small and great, approached the bank on which he stood. All the fish kept their heads out of the water, and seemed to be looking attentively on St Anthony's face; all were ranged in perfect order and most peacefully, the smaller ones in front near the bank, after them came those a little bigger, and last of all, were the water was deeper, the largest.
    As he continued speaking, the fish began to open their mouths and bow their heads, endeavoring as much as was in their power to express their reverence. The people of the city, hearing of the miracle, made haste to go and witness it.