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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S: 08/10/17

Thursday, August 10, 2017

ALL AMERICAN SOAP BOX DERBY FROM AKRON, OHIO!!






   The Soap Box Derby is a youth soapbox car racing program which has been run in the United States since 1934. World Championship finals are held each July at Derby Downs in Akron, Ohio. Cars competing in this and related events are unpowered, relying completely upon gravity to move.  This years event was held from July 16th to the 22nd for 2017.

History

   In the wake of the first car races, local kid auto races took place in the US at a very early stage. In 1914 the motion picture Kid Auto Races at Venice starring Charlie Chaplin was shown in the cinemas.  The first All-American race was held in Dayton on August 19, 1934, after an idea by Myron Scott, a photographer for the Dayton Daily News. The following year, the race was moved to Akron because of its central location
and hilly terrain. In 1936, Akron civic leaders recognized the need for a permanent track site for the youth racing classic and, through the efforts of the Works Progress Administration (WPA), Derby Downs became a reality.
   An accident in 1935 captured the public's interest, and boosted the event's profile. A car went off the track and struck NBC's top commentator and sportscaster Graham McNamee while he was broadcasting live on the air. Despite a concussion and other injuries (which would necessitate a two-week hospital stay), McNamee described the collision to his listeners and finished his broadcast.












   Using standardized wheels with precision ball bearings, modern gravity-powered racers start at a ramp on top of a hill, attaining speeds of up to 35 miles per hour. Rally races and qualifying races in cities around the world use advanced timing systems that measure the time difference between the competing cars to the thousandth of a second to determine the winner of a heat. Each heat of a race lasts less than 30 seconds. Most races are double elimination races where a racer that loses a heat can work their way through the Challenger's Bracket in an attempt to win the overall race. The annual World Championship race in Akron, however, is a single elimination race which uses overhead photography, triggered by a timing system, to determine the winner of each heat. Approximately 500 racers compete in 2 or 3 car heats to determine a World Champion in each of six divisions.












   During its heyday in the 1950s and 1960s, when Chevrolet was a sponsor and famous TV and movie stars made guest appearances, as many as 70,000 people would gather in August to eat snow cones and cheer hundreds of youthful racer/builders (boys only in early years) ages 11–15 who were the champions of local races around the nation and from several foreign countries. In 1947, actor James Stewart was appearing in the Broadway play Harvey; in order to attend the event, he cancelled a weekend's worth of performances and refunds were issued to ticketholders. At its peak, the Derby was one of the top 5 sporting events in terms of attendance.












   Today there are broader categories that extend the age range to younger racers and permit adults to assist in construction. This is especially helpful for younger children who cannot use power tools, as well as to provide an outlet for adults.
   Starting in 1993, the All-American Soap Box derby began the Rally World Championship. The Rally derby, works on a grand prix style of race where each district, 10 in all, send back a number of champions based on number of racers and races in each district.

Ultimate Speed Challenge

   The Ultimate Speed Challenge is an All American Soap Box Derby sanctioned racing format that was developed in 2004 to preserve the tradition of innovation, creativity, and craftsmanship in the design of a gravity powered racing vehicle while generating intrigue, excitement, and engaging the audience at the annual All-American Soap Box Derby competition. The goal of the event is to attract creative entries designed to reach speeds never before attainable on the historic Akron hill. The competition will consist of three timed runs (one run in each lane), down Akron’s 989’ hill. The car and team that achieve the fastest single run will be declared the winner. The timed runs are completed during the All American Soap Box Derby race week.











   In 2004, during the inaugural run of the Ultimate Speed Challenge, the fastest time was achieved by a car designed and built by the Pearson family, driven by Alicia Kimball, and utilizing high performance pneumatic tires. The time achieved on the 989' track was 27.190 seconds. Jerry Pearson returned to defend the title with driver Nicki Henry in the 2005 Ultimate Speed Challenge beating the 2004 record time and breaking the 27.00 second barrier with a 26.953 seconds elapsed time. John Wargo, from  












  California, put together the 2006 Ultimate Speed Challenge winning team with driver Jenny Rodway. Jenny set a new track record of 26.934 seconds. In 2009, Derek Fitzgerald’s Zero-Error Racing team, with driver Jamie Berndt set a new track record time of 26.924 seconds. In 2010, Mark Overmyer’s Clean Sheet Racing team with wheel experts Duane Delaney and Mark Estes, and driver Jim Overmyer set the track record at 26.861 seconds in the opening heat of the opening round. Several minutes later, driver Sheri Lazowski, also of Team Clean Sheet, lowered the record to 26.844 seconds.











Scandals

   In 1973, 14 year old Jimmy Gronen of Boulder, CO was stripped of his title two days after winning the national race. Suspicions were running high even before the finals, and Gronen was actually booed by many spectators.
   The unusual dimensions of Gronen's margins of victory and heat times tipped off derby officials to illegal circumstances surrounding Gronen's racer. Subsequent X-ray examination of his car revealed an electromagnet in the nose. When activated at the starting line, the electromagnet would pull the car forward by attracting it to the steel paddle used to start the race. Gronen would activate the electromagnet by leaning his helmet against the backrest of his seat, which activated its power source. This became












very evident as Gronen's heat times progressively slowed down as the race wore on, because the electromagnet lost strength each time it was activated. Usually, heat times get faster each time a racer completes a heat. Videotape of the race also showed a suspiciously sudden lead for Gronen just a few feet after each heat began. The margin of victory for a race heat will normally be no more than 1 to 3 feet. Gronen's early heat victories were in the 20 to 30 feet range. (Aluminum insulator plates were added to the starting ramps in 1974 to render an electromagnetic system useless.)
   Midway through the 1973 race, Derby officials also replaced Gronen's wheels after chemicals were found to be applied to the wheels' rubber. The chemicals caused the tire rubber to swell, which reduced the rolling resistance of the tire.











   In the final heat, Gronen finished narrowly ahead of Bret Yarborough. Within two days, Yarborough was declared the 1973 champion.
   Gronen's uncle and legal guardian at the time, wealthy engineer Robert Lange, was indicted for contributing to the delinquency of a minor and paid a $2,000 settlement. Lange's son, Bob Lange Jr. (and Jimmy Gronen's cousin) had won the previous 1972 Derby using a car considered to be indistinguishable from the vehicle used by Gronen. Boulder, Colorado was also banned from any future participation in the All-American Soap Box Derby.

LES FETES De La NOUVELLE FRANCE SAQ FROM QUEBEC, CANADA!

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The SAQ New France Festival

   Organized as part of Québec City’s 400th anniversary celebrations in 2008, the New France Festival was first held in 1997 at the behest of the Québec City municipal authorities who were looking to set a historic festival inspired by the lives of the first European settlers against the background of Old Québec. The event was such a success from the start that it quickly became an annual event.
   The festival sought to bring to life over a dozen sites, all in the historic district of Old Québec. It is set to the background of Québec City, one of North America’s most historic cities. The event is aimed at city residents, visitors, families, and anyone with an interest in history.
   The decision to hold ongoing activities on the sites and in the streets throughout the event is a key part of the New France Festival. Drawing on a number of artistic disciplines and a host of different approaches, history is brought to life for visitors in any number of ways. The event has come up with a style of its own by integrating a host of resources blending art and history, evoking and reconstructing past and present. The entire festival is associated with a series of ongoing activities that includes parades and performances of all sorts, which with the help of visitors help create a festival atmosphere that is one of a kind and perfect for celebrating history.  This years event is being held from August 9th to the 13th for 2017.










   Historical content is key to the event. A different theme is chosen each year to allow the New France Festival to come up with original ways to present every facet of history in order to shed light on a period or important historical phenomenon, allowing visitors to discover and share in a whole new world. A broad range of cultural activities with an arts and entertainment flavor are put on, and such quality content has enabled the festival to become a major event.
   Just like the enormous popular festivals of the past, the New France Festival is steeped in a fun and celebratory atmosphere. The atmosphere comes from both the planned activites and the extras who work the sites and the streets of Old Québec and quickly spreads to everyone else involved in the festival, bringing the city to life every summer.

Highlights

   Organized as part of Québec City’s 400th anniversary celebrations in 2008, the New France Festival was first held in 1997 at the behest of the Québec City municipal authorities who were looking to set a historic festival inspired by the lives of the first European settlers against the background of Old Québec. The event was such a success from the start that it quickly became an annual event.
   The festival sought to bring to life over a dozen sites, all in the historic district of Old Québec. It is set to the background of Québec City, one of North America’s most historic cities. The event is aimed at city residents, visitors, families, and anyone with an interest in history.
   The decision to hold ongoing activities on the sites and in the streets throughout the event is a key part of the New France Festival. Drawing on a number of artistic disciplines and a host of different approaches, history is brought to life for visitors in any number of ways. The event has come up with a style of its own by integrating a host of resources blending art and history, evoking and reconstructing past and present. The entire festival is associated with a series of ongoing activities that includes parades and performances of all sorts, which with the help of visitors help create a festival atmosphere that is one of a kind and perfect for celebrating history.











   Historical content is key to the event. A different theme is chosen each year to allow the New France Festival to come up with original ways to present every facet of history in order to shed light on a period or important historical phenomenon, allowing visitors to discover and share in a whole new world. A broad range of cultural activities with an arts and entertainment flavor are put on, and such quality content has enabled the festival to become a major event.
   Just like the enormous popular festivals of the past, the New France Festival is steeped in a fun and celebratory atmosphere. The atmosphere comes from both the planned activites and the extras who work the sites and the streets of Old Québec and quickly spreads to everyone else involved in the festival, bringing the city to life every summer.


Québec’s biggest family historical and cultural festival!

   One of the top ten festivals in Québec, all categories (ranked by Commerce magazine, March 2008)

Over 30,000 costumed festivalgoers
Over 500 performances of all kinds
Over 300 artists
Over 400 volunteers, including 135 volunteer performers





275,000 visitors each year

A $2.3 million operating budget from four main sources:
- Grants from all 3 levels of government
- Private sponsorship
- Public financing campaigns, notably Médaillon sales
- Funds raised through the sale of products

$13 million of economic, tourism, and social benefits for the Greater Québec City area in 2009.

Festivalgoers’ origin :
Local residents 35%
Tourists 65%

More than 80% said they were satisfied with their visit to the SAQ New France Festival!










History of New France

   New France: French colony in North America from 1534 to 1760
   New France was founded during the age of the great European discoveries in the 16th century. On a voyage of exploration, Frenchman Jacques Cartier landed in North America and “discovered” the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The territory was already populated by indigenous peoples, who called the land “Canada.” In 1534 Cartier erected a cross at Gaspé and claimed Canada in the name of the king of France. The French presence in the North Atlantic grew quickly through the activities of whalers, cod fishermen, and fur traders.
   In the early 17th century, the first permanent settlements in New France were established. In 1608 Samuel de Champlain, considered the founder of New France, built a habitation in what would later become Québec City, making it his base for trade and other economic ventures. French colonists began to settle in the St. Lawrence Valley and Acadia.










   These early settlers played a major role in New France’s development by introducing newcomers from France to the land, climate, and the aboriginal nations who made North America their home. The writings of missionaries living among the First Nations were another source of information.
   As European explorers ventured further and further afield, trade thrived and new towns and trading posts sprang up. Although they attracted colonists and their descendents, the colony’s numbers remained too small to make much headway.
In the late 17th century, faced with the inability of private interests to properly administer the colony, New France’s future was placed in the hands of the king.    Louis XIV put a new administrative structure in place and the colony thrived anew as exploration, commercial undertakings, and settlement initiatives resumed.
   In the growing colony, tradesmen and small farmers made up the bulk of the French population, along with merchants, soldiers, laborers, members of the middle class, several nobles and clergymen, the Filles du Roy, coureurs des bois, and a few slaves.French North America reached its peak in the 18th century. By this time, its boundaries had expanded considerably to encompass over half of the continent, extending all the way from Hudson Bay to Louisiana, and including a goodly portion of the present-day Maritime provinces, the entire St. Lawrence Valley, the Great Lakes Basin, and the Mississippi Valley. Like the other European powers of the time, France hoped to find a route across the continent to the Western Sea, and on to Asia.
However, the British colonies, already a threat, became too populous and encircled New France. In 1713, France ceded Newfoundland, Acadia, and Hudson Bay to England under the Treaty of Utrecht. In the time of peace that followed, New France’s economy took off once more, allowing France to prepare for war.
And it was not long before war came. New France was conquered in 1760 and handed over to England once and for all three years later under the Treaty of Paris. Only Louisiana remained in French hands, but it too was ultimately ceded to the United States in 1803.









Québec Giants  

   The family of giants is spread over many continents. Distant cousins can be found in South America, Africa and Asia. In Europe alone, giants may be found in England, Germany, Belgium, Spain, France, Portugal and the Netherlands. The Québec City giants, unique in North America, have now added a branch to the family tree.
   The family of giants is spread over many continents. Distant cousins can be found in South America, Africa and Asia. In Europe alone, giants may be found in England, Germany, Belgium, Spain, France, Portugal and the Netherlands. The Québec City giants, unique in North America, have now added a branch to the family tree.The characters brought to life by the giants typify the cultural, historical identity of the celebration that is the New France Festival. Since 2002, one or more giants have been added to the family each year and then presented to the public during the parades.At the moment, thirdteen giants proudly represent the festival.

  • Champlain
  • Grand Cru
  • Belle Gueule
  • Louis Ango de Maizerets
  • Monique Purelaine
  • Marie Victoire
  • Le Grand Esprit des Nations
  • Nicolas dit Noble Cœur
  • Émeline et Louis
  • Capitaine Vaillant
  • Monsieur du Talion
     

Champlain


   The Champlain Giant is the largest of the Québec giants! Standing 6m tall, it takes two people to carry him.
Above all else, Champlain is a cartographer and throughout his whole life he burns with the desire to find a passage through which to cross the continent from coast to coast. His skirt draws its inspiration from one of Champlain’s many maps, with his illustrations and writing carefully reproduced like a timeline, highlighting some of the historic events witnessed by Québec City. Finally, Champlain is represented in bronze, symbolic of the numerous statues erected in his honour, underscoring the role he plays in the country’s collective memory.









Grand Cru

   The "Grand Cru" giant has acquired wisdom and maturity. He is a true connoisseur, having benefited from the excellent advice of the SAQ. Sensitive, competent, with a streak of humour... balance is everything when it comes to making a Grand Cru!
   He has a light body, his dress made up of vegetables recalling the variety of products on offer at the SAQ. His texture is composed of natural fibres, combining flexibility and rigidity.
   His is a happy marriage of spicy aromas and the scent of fruits and vegetables. His perfume evokes childhood memories, encouraging us to join the dance and follow him for the parade.
His colours respect natural hues, moving from golden yellow with a hint of green, to a purple-blue shade of ruby, while conserving intensity and harmony

Belle Gueule

   The “Belle Gueule" Giant joined the event in 2006. A friendly monk, he is the latest addition to the family. He spends his days brewing beer, with his body language revealing the care he puts into his craft

Louis Ango de Maizerets

   This giant was designed and created in the image of Louis Ango de Maizerets. He was supervisor at the Québec Seminary when the institution purchased part of the Notre-Dame-des-Anges seigniory in 1705. 5m tall, he played an important role in the history of the Domaine de Maizerets.

Monique Purelaine

   The giant from the Limoilou part of town symbolizes its history and culture: a young mother in her 30s representing the generations of working-class people who came to live in the area at start of the century.
   Pregnant, this giant carries the future of a part of Québec City within her. She is represented by way of a housewife to highlight her role and importance, as well as the responsibility of so many women, married to working men, through whom everything began.
   Monique Purelaine also symbolizes the cultural aspect of Limoilou through her apron, inspired by the work and the colours of the artist Pellan. This piece of clothing is made up of a mosaic of historical symbols representing different facets of this area of town that has always been rich in diversity.









Marie Victoire

   Marie-Victoire symbolizes all the women of New France - the grandmother, the mother, the wife, the daugther - who contributed to the demographic development of the new territory. Even though she symbolizes both past and present, the child she is holding in her arms gives us a glimpse of the future as the colony continues to evolve towards prosperity.

The Great Spirit of the Nations

   The Great Spirit of the Nations proudly represents Amerindian cultures, paying tribute to the First Nations, the country's first inhabitants. The character of a woman underlines the matriarchal predominance in such cultures.
The Great Spirit of the Nations proudly represents Amerindian cultures, paying tribute to the First Nations, the country's first inhabitants. The character of a woman underlines the matriarchal predominance in such cultures. The clothing of the Great Spirit of the Nations refers to many symbols precious to the Amerindian cultures: circles, the four elements (water, land, air and fire), the concepts of life and death (marked at the same time by the presence of spirits and by things that have belonged to the deceased such as his weapons, tobacco, etc.)

Nicolas dit Noble Cœur

   The Nicolas dit Noble Cœur giant is a tribute to the soldiers of the Carignan-Sallières Regiment. It was the first regiment in New France and many of its soldiers decided to remain in the colony, becoming lords of the New World's seigniories. Symbolically, we could consider Nicolas dit Noble Cœur and Marie-Victoire to be the colony's mother and father. The Nicolas dit Noble Cœur giant is a tribute to the soldiers of the Carignan-Sallières Regiment. It was the first regiment in New France and many of its soldiers decided to remain in the colony, becoming lords of the New World's seigniories. Symbolically, we could consider Nicolas dit Noble Cœur and Marie-Victoire to be the colony's mother and father. This giant, representing a soldier of the period, wears a uniform that includes a map of France upon which the origins of the regiment's soldiers are marked. Nicolas dit Noble Cœur highlights the patronymic ties between France and New France, but also the genealogical ties, as many children born in New France were descended from the soldiers of the Carignan-Sallières regiment.

Émeline et Louis

   Émeline and Louis, the first giants created by the SAQ New France Festival, make a fine couple. They were created in partnership with Louisiana and inspired by the two legendary Acadian characters Évangéline and Gabriel, whose story is told so memorably in Henry Longfellow's epic poem Evangeline.
Émeline and Louis, the first giants created by the SAQ New France Festival, make a fine couple. They were created in partnership with Louisiana and inspired by the two legendary Acadian characters Évangéline and Gabriel, whose story is told so memorably in Henry Longfellow's epic poem Evangeline. Separated during the Deportation of 1755, they symbolize an eternal but impossible love, a love that not even death can put an end to. Separately, each giant is a symbol in itself: Émeline, with her embroidery in her hands, symbolises the patience and fidelity of love, and the purity of the virgin. Louis resembles an oak tree, the same type of tree where, according to the legend, Évangeline finds Gabriel again. Louis typifies the strength and longevity of love, a symbol of immortality.








Capitaine Vaillant

   Captain Vaillant represents the father of the New France explorers and typifies the exploring spirit. His head is made of a globe on which you can see a ship; he holds a telescope. His robe is made of multiple parchments related to various subjects. They look like the notebooks of the great explorers, whose sketches and notes allowed them to transmit and store many observations about the fauna and flora of the New World.

Monsieur du Talion

   Monsieur du Talion is an allegory of the judicial system as applied in New France and a direct reference to the famous Law of Retaliation (Loi du Talion). He symbolizes the hangman, in front of whom, all too frequently, many criminal affairs were settled.
   Monsieur du Talion is an allegory of the judicial system as applied in New France and a direct reference to the famous Law of Retaliation (Loi du Talion). He symbolizes the hangman, in front of whom, all too frequently, many criminal affairs were settled. At the time, justice still relied upon questioning and torture, considering a person guilty until they could prove their innoncence. With no shortage of people who had been found guilty to be punished, hangmen, recruited from among those sentenced to death, represented the arm of the exemplary justice. Monsieur du Talion, wearing many instruments of torture, is a tribute to those who were forced to torture prisoners. The upper part of his body is carved out of stone, indicating the unshakable nature of the task he is to carry out.


What is a Giant ?


Giants represent whole regions, cities, and communities.





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   Carried giants can be traced back to 18th century Portugal.  Originally, Giants appeared in Western Europe to add color and educational value to communal and religious processions. From the 15th century onward, these giant figures were used to illustrate scenes from the bible, tales from the Golden Legend, and epic poems. With time, the Giants changed in meaning and came to represent regions, cities, and neighborhoods. Adapted to ideas of different eras, Giants moved away from processions to become increasingly profane figures used in carnivals, village fetes, and religious festivals, too.
   In Europe, where they have existed for over seven centuries, Giants took part in many popular festivals all year long, as well as parades and church celebrations. Giants were not limited to their own countries and traveled abroad, revealing their wide-ranging styles and sometimes marrying into other European cultures. They were also used to celebrate births, baptisms, and wedding anniversaries, retaining their ties to traditions, collective memory, and community identity.
   Today, giants meet regularly at international festivals and parades offering innovative insights to their own culture and history. They weigh more than 45 kg (100 lbs.) and are usually carried on a person's back.
   In Québec City, more than a dozen Giants have been created since 2002. The most imposing of them being Samuel de Champlain, the city’s founder; you’ll find him at the heart of the celebration!

Costumes in New France

Costumes in New France - LES BEAUX ATOURS (1675-1715)

1. Commoners
2. Bourgeoisie
3. Nobility
4. Lexicon

Commoners

   In New France, clothing for both men and women of the lower classes was generally made with rough or fine woolen fabrics (wool and cotton weaves).

Men

   MenHair was worn long and natural, often covered by a (usually red) toque, a type of woolen hat. Shirts were made of white cotton with collars and buttoned cuffs. Pants were made of woolen fabrics, featured button flies, and were fitted at the knee.
   Men also wore waistcoats, which were buttoned at the front and featured pockets and basques*. They also wore ties of fine canvass tied at the neck, with both ends falling over the chest.
   They wore tailored or knitted long wool stockings held up by garters and leather shoes that tied at the top with a metal buckle. Some also wore clogs.






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Women

   Women covered their hair with quilted bonnets tied under the chin. These bonnets were made of quilted canvass and always worn under a head covering known as a cornette*, while other bonnets, such as single or double rowed bonnets*, were worn alone.
   Women wore canvass or muslin neckerchiefs. White cotton blouses were short sleeved and open at the neck.
Bodices were fitted garments with basques* and sleeves tied at the front or back.
Skirts, worn over petticoats, were long and generous and made of woolen fabric.
Aprons were made of heavy canvass or dark woolen fabric. Women always wore white aprons in public.
Stockings were made of wool and held by garters at the knee. They were worn with shoes or clogs.

Bourgeoisie

   The clothing of the better off was tailored from silk, velvet, or beautiful woolen fabrics. The bourgeoisie had many more colors to choose from.

Men

 Man Wigs were the height of fashion, along with canes and gloves. Three-cornered hats were adorned with feathers.
 Shirts were white and made of fine canvass, featuring jabots and oversleeves.
 Pants were tailored from rich cloth and ended at the knees. They boasted beautiful metal buttons that were both decorative and practical.
 Men’s waistcoats, which featured embroideries and braids, were worn under ornate justaucorps.
Long, straight ties were made of muslin and wrapped around the neck with their knotted ends falling over the chest.
   Stockings were made of red or pink silk. Shoes had square toes and high heels.





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Women

Ladies wore their hair in the Fontange style.
Their white blouses were of fine canvass adorned with lace collars and engageantes.
Fitted dresses featured short, narrow sleeves.
Dress coats were left open at the front to reveal ladies’ stomachers*. The bottoms of the dresses were raised and pinned at the back.
Skirts were ornately decorated with pleats and appliqués.
Silk stockings and shoes were covered in rich cloth.
Ladies often carried fans or parasols or wore gloves.
When indoors or in the garden, they would wear lace aprons.

Nobility

   The ornate clothing of the nobility was made of luxurious fabrics well beyond the reach of the other classes, who had to settle for imitating the cut of their clothing.

Men

Man Wigs, known as in folio, were so cumbersome that noblemen had to carry their hats under their arms.
Their white shirts featured jabots and cuffs. Jabots, cuffs, and ties were adorned with the finest Point de France or Point de Venise lace.
A Steinkerque-style tie was wound twice around the neck and its ends were inserted into the sixth buttonhole of the justaucorps*.
Vests were embroidered with gold and silver thread. Justaucorps worn on top were decorated with golden braids and ribbons.
Men wore pants of the finest figured silk.
Stockings were made of silk, and shoes covered in figured silk.
Men carried canes and wore gloves.





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Women

   Ladies wore their hair in the Fontange style, and the lace they wore was decorated with butterflies or hornets made of gems.
Their white shirts of fine canvass were open at the neck and adorned with frilled lace.
Engageantes were decorated with Point de France or Point de Venise lace.
Dresses were tailored from the finest figured silk* and ornately decorated with gold and silver thread.
Skirts were adorned with appliqués and fringes* and worn over layered petticoats.
Women protected their pale skin from the sun with gloves and parasols.
Their stockings were made of silk, and their shoes covered with figured silk*.
Note: From the age of six, children from all social classes dressed as adults, according to social class.

Lexicon

  • Basques : Lower part of an item of clothing, flared according to the fashion of the day
  • Cornette : A head covering whose long tails could be tied up or left free.
  • Engageantes : Fixed, funnel-shaped lace decorations at the end of the sleeves on a woman’s garment.
  • Figured silk : A rich silk fabric adorned with embossed designs of gold and silver thread.
  • Fontange hairstyle : High curls above the forehead with two locks forming kiss curls on the forehead. The hair was swept up into a bun at the back, with curls falling forward onto the forehead and down onto the nape of the neck. A bonnet covered the bun, and large folds of lace were raised into a high structure atop the head.
  • Fringes : Loose ends of cloth at the edges of a cut.
  • Jabots : Lace (or muslin) decorations sewn around the shirt collar and spread across the chest.
  • Justaucorps : Embroidered garment covered with braids and ribbons. It was taken in at the waist and extended to the knees. It featured basques, banded cuffs, and pockets placed high or low on the garment, depending on the fashion of the day. The bottom was split down the back and along the sides.
  • Oversleeve : Detachable decorations adorning the cuffs of a man’s shirt.
  • Quilted bonnet : A quilted bonnet comprising three pieces (the center and both sides). The outside was made of canvass and lined with fustian (a cotton fabric from the Orient that could be plain or feature a striped or moiré design).Cotton was inserted between these two layers, and the whole thing was pinned to keep the cotton in place.
  • Single or double rowed bonnet : A bonnet adorned with light or dark colored bands of fabrics surrounding the face.
  • Stomacher : An ornate or embroidered triangular garment used to cover the lacings of a corset.

LA TOMATINA FROM BUNOL, SPAIN!!

La Tomatina is a festival that is held in the Valencian town of Buñol, in which participants throw tomatoes at each other. It is held the last Wednesday in August, during the week of festivities of Buñol.
History

Changes Throughout Its History

   The tomato fight has been a strong tradition in Buñol since 1944 or 1945. No one is completely certain how this event originated. Possible theories on how the Tomatina began include a local food fight among friends, a juvenile class war, a volley of tomatoes from bystanders at a carnival parade, a practical joke on a bad musician, the anarchic aftermath of an accidental lorry spillage. One of the most popular theories is that disgruntled townspeople attacked city councilmen with tomatoes during a town celebration.
   In 1950, the council allowed the party to happen. The next year however it was not approved, thanks to pressure from town residents and other participants.
When the festival was finally officially sanctioned, the launching of tomatoes became inventive. Methods such as using water canons, catapults and filling of fountains of rivals became common. Between the noise and chaos, participants typically primed










with those who were mere spectators, including local personalities. By 1957 the festival was once again banned with strict penalties, including imprisonment, threatened against those flouting the ban. In that year, the neighborhood decided to organize what they called "the funeral of the tomato", which came in a procession carrying a coffin with a great tomato, accompanied by a band playing funeral marches along the path.
   Due to local pressure, in 1959 the town finally approved the Tomatina, but imposed a rule that people could only throw tomatoes after a horn sounded and should end when it sounded a second time.
   Between 1975 and 1980 the festival was organized by the ordeal of San Luis Bertran, who supplied the tomatoes, replacing the previous arrangement of participants bringing their own. The party became popular in Spain thanks to Javier Basilio reporting the issue in the RTVE Informe Semanal in 1983.









   Since 1980 the City Council provides participants with tomatoes, each year a greater tonnage than the previous year. Visitors became attracted to the event and in 2002 it was declared a Fiesta of International Tourist Interest. In 2008 a soundtrack was created, the song of the Tomatina "Todo es del mismo color" created by the bunyolense rock band "Malsujeto".











Description

   At around 10am festivities begin with the first event of the Tomatina. It is the "palo jabón", similar to the greasy pole. The goal is to climb a greased pole with a ham on top. As this happens, the revellers work into a frenzy of singing and dancing whilst being showered in water from hoses. Once someone is able to drop the ham off the pole, the start signal for the tomato fight is given. The signal for the onset is at about 11 when a loud shot rings out, and the chaos begins.










   Several trucks throw tomatoes in abundance in the Plaza del Pueblo. The tomatoes come from Extremadura, where they are less expensive and are grown specifically for the holidays, being of inferior taste.  For the participants the use of goggles and gloves are recommended. The tomatoes must be crushed before being thrown so as to reduce the risk of injury.










After exactly one hour, the fight ends with the firing of the second shot, announcing the end. The whole town square is coloured red and rivers of tomato juice flow freely. Fire Trucks hose down the streets and participants use hoses that locals provide to remove the tomato paste from their bodies. Some participants go to the pool of “los peñones” to wash. After the cleaning, the village cobblestone streets are pristine due to the acidity of the tomato disinfecting and thoroughly cleaning the surfaces.


Trivia
   La Tomatina Buñol has inspired other similar celebrations in other parts of the world:
  • Since 2004 the Colombian town of Sutamarchán holds a similar event on the 15th of June when a surplus of tomatoes is harvested.
  • In Costa Rica the town of San José de Trojas (Valverde Vega Canton) celebrates a tomatine during the local Tomato Fair in February.









 In the town of Dongguan in southern Guangdong province in China, a tomato fight is held on the 19th of October, during which they use up to 15 tons of tomatoes.
  • The City of Reno, Nevada in the United States also has an annual hour long tomato fight that started in 2009. The event seems to take place on the last Sunday of August, and is organized by the American Cancer Society. Organizers also named the festival La Tomatina, and give full credit for the idea to the Spanish festival.
  • On February 12, 2011, at the field of Esparraguera, town of Quillón, VIIIth Region, Chile, the first version of the Great Tomato War was held under the auspices of the local municipality and a private firm. Like the spanish Tomatina, it was a playful battle involving young people.









 The video game company Namco included in the 6th installment of the saga Tekken fighting game, a scenario that mimics the Tomatina buñolense.
  • The festival was recreated for the song Ik Junoon (Paint it red) from the 2011 Hindi film Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara.